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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
 
What is an RMT?
What Is Massage Therapy?
How can Massage Therapy help me?
Can anyone receive Massage Therapy?
How often should I have Massage Therapy?
What happens on the first visit? And subsequent visits?
Is Massage Therapy covered by OHIP or my employer?
Do I need to wear any special clothing to the appointment?
I heard that massage can hurt a little. Is that right?
What is Lymphedema?
What is Lymph and what is the Lymph Vessel System?
I recently sprained my wrist …  is my swelling normal or is it Lymphedema?
How can Lymphedema be treated?
 
 
 
 

 


 
 

What is an RMT?



An RMT – or Registered Massage Therapist – is an individual who has completed extensive studies (2-3 years) in anatomy, physiology, pathology, physical assessment, neurology and treatments. An RMT is licensed or "registered" by the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario (the College) after passing comprehensive provincial examinations.

Only members of the College are permitted to use the title, Massage Therapist or Registered Massage Therapist or the designation RMT.

The profession of Massage Therapy is regulated in the Province of Ontario (in accordance with the Regulated Health Professions Act and the Massage Therapy Act). As such, Massage Therapy should be performed only by a Registered Massage Therapist (RMT).

 
 
 

What Is Massage Therapy?


Massage Therapy is the manipulation of the soft tissues of the body including muscles, connective tissue, tendons, ligaments and joints. Massage Therapy helps relieve the discomfort associated with everyday and occupational stresses, muscular over-use and many chronic pain conditions. If employed early enough after injury or trauma, Massage Therapy can greatly reduce the development of painful muscular patterning.
 
 
 

How can Massage Therapy help me?


Massage Therapy can be beneficial to people of all ages and conditions and is widely used to help obtain relief from many specific problems, including:

Stress relief and associated conditions
Repetitive strain injury
Inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and tendonitis
Headaches and migraines
Muscle and related conditions such as spasms, strains and sprains
Back pain or sciatic (leg) pain
Circulatory and Respiratory problems
Pregnancy discomfort
Post-injury and post surgical rehabilitation
Post-cancer treatment care for lymphedema

 
 
 
 
 

Can anyone receive Massage Therapy?



Yes, Massage Therapy is appropriate for individuals of all ages. There are some conditions for which Massage Therapy is not appropriate. A qualified Massage Therapist (RMT) is trained to recognize these cases. Please call to discuss any questions you may have.
 
 
 
 
 

How often should I have Massage Therapy?



Some people believe that one treatment is enough; however, Massage Therapy is most beneficial in acute conditions when used over a series of treatments and then followed up with maintenance or preventive treatments. Your body, like an engine, benefits from regular tune-ups!

Through discussion, Jo-Anne can help you establish a program which fits your physical needs and lifestyle.

 
 
 
 

What happens on the first visit?
And subsequent visits?


Your first visit will include a confidential review of your health history. This review, plus a brief assessment, is considered part of every first appointment. The health history form can be downloaded from the "Contacts" page of this website. Please print and bring the completed form to your first session. This is important. Jo-Anne needs to know if you have any medical conditions or are taking any medications. She will listen to your concerns, assess your individual needs and ask you about lifestyle, nutrition and other factors that may be contributing to your injury. Jo-Anne will then develop a treatment plan with you to ensure you receive appropriate care that will help you return, as much as possible, to your normal activities.

A typical appointment will include: intake, assessment or re-assessment; treatment, self-care recommendations, charting & administration.

 
 
 

Is Massage Therapy covered by OHIP or my employer?


Massage Therapy treatments are not covered by OHIP. However, most employers’ extended health benefits packages cover the services of a Registered Massage Therapist. Some plans may require a physician’s note. Contact your employer for more information.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 

Do I need to wear any special clothing to the appointment?



No. During your treatment, clients are covered with a blanket and/ or sheet, for both comfort and modesty. Typically, clients will disrobe down to their undergarments, but a treatment can be adjusted to accommodate the amount of clothing in which you feel most comfortable.
 
 
 
 
 
 

I’ve heard that massage can hurt a little. Is that right?



All the techniques should be within your comfort zone. Some people naturally prefer deeper pressure and others lighter. Often, the depth of pressure that may feel ideal for one area may not feel good in another. Jo-Anne may check in from time to time with you, but you should always feel free to let her know if you are ever feeling uncomfortable.
 
 
 
 
 

What is Lymphedema?



Lymphedema is the abnormal swelling of a body part – usually an arm or leg – and is caused by an accumulation of lymph fluid in the tissues.

One may have the condition from birth or acquire it later in life. When acquired, it is often secondary to cancer treatment. (Example: the swelling of an arm, fingers or thorax after breast cancer treatment.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

What is Lymph and what is the Lymph Vessel System?



We have two circulatory systems in our body. One is for blood; the other is for lymphatic fluid (lymph). Lymph is a colourless, protein-rich liquid that flows through specialized capillaries, lymph nodes and lymph tissue. 

The lymphatic system has two main functions. It removes impurities (waste products, bacteria, dead cells and large protein molecules) from the circulatory system and it supplies white blood cells – playing a crucial role in the body’s immune system.

When the lymph vessels are unable to transport lymph fluid back into the blood, it accumulates, resulting in swelling and thickening of the skin. This build-up is known as lymphedema. Once this condition occurs, the swelling may increase if an effective treatment program is not started.

 
 
 
 

I recently sprained my wrist …  is my swelling normal or is it Lymphedema?
 


Swelling and inflammation is often associated with an injury. An immediate inflammatory response is normal. Inflammation allows wounds and other soft tissue injuries to heal. It also allows infections to resolve with the assistance of the body’s immune system.

In an acute situation (when the wound or injury is relatively new), the treatment remains light and often includes non-invasive lymph drainage techniques to stimulate the body’s immune system and help flush away impurities. This will also help reduce pain and associated muscle spasms.

As the injury heals, Jo-Anne will modify her techniques to further reduce restrictive adhesions and trigger points. She will work to restore range of motion and strength to the area. Also, the areas compensating for the injury will be treated.

 
 
 
 
 
 

How can Lymphedema be treated?



Lymphedema is a serious condition which indicates that the lymph system is unable to handle the lymph load. As it is a progressive condition, treatment should ideally begin as soon as the swelling has been diagnosed or even better – as a preventative program after radiation or removal of lymph nodes to prevent swelling from occurring.

The most effective form of treatment used by professional therapists in North America and Europe is Combined Decongestive Therapy.

This includes:

Manual Lymph Drainage – a specialized type of hands-on massage which stimulates and improves the functioning of the lymph vessel system. In addition to this, lymph can be re-routed into existing, alternate pathways to improve lymphatic return to the blood stream.

Compression Therapy – including the use of compression garments and/or specialized bandaging.

Education –  This includes basic information about the lymph vessel system, causes of lymphedema, self-massage and techniques for self-care and instruction in the use of compression bandages and garments.

Exercise – special recommendations and guidelines.

Skin care – techniques and suggested products to keep skin healthy, to improve its condition or to deal with problems.

 
 
 

 

 



658 Danforth Avenue, Suite 409 
Toronto, ON, M4J 5B9 
Tel: 416-465-8179 
Email: info@massageondanforth.com